Staycations

Staycations

Staycations.  Whatever happened to them?  First off, what are they?  Staycations are longer getaways, usually 4 or more days, at a destination close to home.  They are the perfect opportunity to get to know places closer to home.  Indeed, many people have seen sights in other countries, but have little knowledge of what’s in their backyard.

The Croff House opened in April 2009, 6 months after the stock market crash of September 2008.  At that time we had many people, who had lost money in the crash, booking staycations.  One memorable couple stayed for 5 days as an alternative to their annual vacation to Paris.  They had lived in New York City their whole lives but hey’d never been to the Hudson Valley.  As a result, they discovered long overdue.

So the question becomes, “What’s there to do that will keep me busy?”

Well, there’s tons of options.  First you can just “chillax” at the Inn.  The Croff House is offers the most common spaces, both indoor and out, of any property in Hudson.  Read a good book.  Binge watch on Netflix or Hulu.  Or just take a nap.

Are you a foodie? Grab a bite at one of our favorite eateries in town.  Take a ride down to the Culinary Institute of America for a delicious (and reasonably priced meal).  Wine afficionado?  Check out nearby Hudson-Chatham Winery or Tousey Winery.  History buff?  Olana, Cedar Grove and Lindenwald are not to be missed.  Hiking enthusiast?  Get you blood pumping at Kaaterskill Falls or Bash Bish Falls.  Don’t feel like doing the driving?  Let Table to Farm tours take you on adventure throughout Columbia and Greene counties.

There’s plenty to do to fill your days!  What about the nights?

With all the entertainment venues in and around Hudson there’s always something to choose from.  Helsinki Hudson, Hudson Hall, Time and Space Limited, PS21, The Fischer Center at Bard and the list goes on.  Everything from classical concerts to cabaret to open-mic nights are on tap.

Book your staycation with us and let us help you discover all there is to do so close to home.

Fall Foliage

fall foliage

Fall Foliage is one of the most popular times to visit the Hudson Valley.  All the colors of the season are on display.  Vibrant yellows, deep reds and rich oranges cover the hillsides and mountains.   Every day brings a new palette.  Temperatures drop and each morning dew covers the ground.  The most frequent question we get is “When’s the best time for Fall Foliage?”  Here’s our standard answer: Who knows?

Now that doesn’t sound helpful.  However, it’s truthful.  No one can predict when Fall Foliage will occur.  The Farmer’s Almanac tries, but let’s just call it their “best guess”.  The changing of the leaves is dependent on two main things: rain and temperature.

Too much rain and the leaves become sodden and turn brown and fall.  Too little rain and the leaves shrivel and drop.  If the evening temperatures drop quickly the leaves change color faster.  Warmer daytime temperatures slow that process.  Wind is also a factor.  As Fall Foliage occurs the leaves lose their grip on the branches and strong winds strip the trees.

Ideally peak Fall Foliage time is around President’s Day in the middle of October.  But this year we are already seeing color change in early September.  Most likely we will have an early Fall Foliage season.  We haven’t had a lot of rain, though.  Night time temperatures are in the mid-50’s and in the 70’s during the day, which is good.  A little warmer would be better.  An “Indian Summer” would be ideal.  Unfortunately the weather will do what it’s going to and we just have to hope for the best.

So if you’re wondering when the peak “leaf peepring” is, our advice is to follow Hudson’s weather.  See any of the trends above, then make your reservation and cross your fingers.  As the saying goes, “Don’t like the weather, just wait a minute.”

Check availability at The Croff House.

Getting to Hudson

Getting to Hudson with historic charm

Getting to Hudson with historic charm

A new mode of travel for getting to Hudson will harken back to yesteryear, a time when the journey was part of the experience.

For 90 years the S.S. Columbia served as a passenger steamer between New York City and various Hudson Valley ports along the Hudson River.  The oldest passenger steamer in the United States, the S.S. Columbia was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.  In 2006 preservationist Richard Anderson came up with the idea of restoring the vessel, which had been decaying at an industrial pier in Detroit.  Even though Anderson died in 2013 his plans for the Columbia were kept afloat (pun intended).  In September 2014 the S.S. Columbia began the journey to New York, where she will be refitted and returned to service along the Hudson.

You can read more about the history and status of the S.S. Columbia project here.

So if you’ve been waiting for some way of getting to Hudson that doesn’t involve driving and avoids Amtrak your wait may soon be over.